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Using Table Variable Operators

Leveraging SQLScript in Stored Procedures, User Defined Functions, and User Defined Libraries
You will learn
  • How to update procedure to use Table Variable Operators to manipulate the immediate table variables
rich-heilmanRich HeilmanJanuary 5, 2021
Created by
rich-heilman
May 5, 2020
Contributors
rich-heilman

Prerequisites

  • This tutorial is designed for SAP HANA on premise and SAP HANA, express edition. It is not designed for SAP HANA Cloud.
  • Tutorials: Using Index Based Cell Access

In this tutorial, you will update the previous procedure to now use Table Variable Operators to manipulate the immediate table variables. We can use table variable operators to perform DML like operations on table variables without having to invoke the SQL layer. In this exercise, we will experiment with the INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, and SEARCH operators.

  • Step 1

    Return to the procedure called build_products in the procedure folder.

    procedure editor
  • Step 2

    Remove the code inside the body, between the BEGIN and END statements leaving only the two lines shown here.

    remove
  • Step 3

    Use the INSERT operator to copy all rows of lt_products into the output parameter called ex_products. Then use the INSERT operator to insert 3 new products into the output table. Since you are specifying the actual index, it will insert your new rows at that index and push all existing rows down.

    insert
  • Step 4

    The complete code should look very similar to this.

    PROCEDURE "build_products" (
    	  out ex_products table (PRODUCTID nvarchar(10),
            CATEGORY nvarchar(20),
           PRICE decimal(15,2) ) )
       LANGUAGE SQLSCRIPT
       SQL SECURITY INVOKER
       --DEFAULT SCHEMA <default_schema_name>
       READS SQL DATA AS
    BEGIN
    
     declare lt_products table like :ex_products;
    
     lt_products = select PRODUCTID, CATEGORY, PRICE from "MD.Products";
     :ex_products.INSERT(:lt_products);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductA', 'Software', '1999.99'), 1);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductB', 'Software', '2999.99'), 2);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductC', 'Software', '3999.99'), 3);
    
    END
    
    
  • Step 5

    Use what you have learned and Save your work, perform a Build on the module. Then return to the Database Explorer and call the procedure. In the Results tab, you should see the product data including the new products that you have inserted.

    results
  • Step 6

    Return to the procedure and further modify it. Enter a DECLARE statement as shown. Also add a FOR loop to loop
    through the rows and update the price using the UDPATE operator

    update
  • Step 7

    The complete code should look very similar to this.

    PROCEDURE "build_products" (
    	        out ex_products table (PRODUCTID nvarchar(10),
                                   CATEGORY nvarchar(20),
                                   PRICE decimal(15,2) ) )
       LANGUAGE SQLSCRIPT
       SQL SECURITY INVOKER
       READS SQL DATA AS
    BEGIN
    
     declare lt_products table like :ex_products;
     declare lv_index int = 0;
    
     lt_products = select PRODUCTID, CATEGORY, PRICE from "MD.Products";
     :ex_products.INSERT(:lt_products);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductA', 'Software', '1999.99'), 1);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductB', 'Software', '2999.99'), 2);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductC', 'Software', '3999.99'), 3);
    
     FOR lv_index IN 1..record_count(:ex_products) DO
       :ex_products.(PRICE).UPDATE((:ex_products.PRICE[lv_index] * 1.25), lv_index);
     END FOR;
    
    
    END
    
  • Step 8

    Use what you have learned and Save your work, perform a Build on the module. Then return to the Database Explorer and call the procedure. In the Results tab, you should see the product data including the new products that you have inserted and now the prices have been increased.

    results
  • Step 9

    Return to the procedure and further modify it. Enter DECLARE statements as shown. Also add a FOR loop determine which lines to delete, and finally use the DELETE operator to delete the rows all at once.

    delete
  • Step 10

    The complete code should look very similar to this.

    PROCEDURE "build_products" (
    	        out ex_products table (PRODUCTID nvarchar(10),
                                   CATEGORY nvarchar(20),
                                   PRICE decimal(15,2) ) )
       LANGUAGE SQLSCRIPT
       SQL SECURITY INVOKER
       READS SQL DATA AS
    BEGIN
    
     declare lt_products table like :ex_products;
     declare lv_index int = 0;
     declare lv_del_index int array;
     declare lv_array_index int = 0;
    
     lt_products = select PRODUCTID, CATEGORY, PRICE from "MD.Products";
     :ex_products.INSERT(:lt_products);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductA', 'Software', '1999.99'), 1);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductB', 'Software', '2999.99'), 2);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductC', 'Software', '3999.99'), 3);
    
     FOR lv_index IN 1..record_count(:ex_products) DO
       :ex_products.(PRICE).UPDATE((:ex_products.PRICE[lv_index] * 1.25), lv_index);
     END FOR;
    
     FOR lv_index IN 1..record_count(:ex_products) DO
       IF :ex_products.PRICE[lv_index] <= 2500.00 THEN
        lv_array_index = lv_array_index + 1;
        lv_del_index[lv_array_index] = lv_index;
      END IF;
     END FOR;
    
     :ex_products.DELETE(:lv_del_index);
    
    
    END
    
    
  • Step 11

    Use what you have learned and Save your work, perform a Build on the module. Then return to the Database Explorer and call the procedure. In the Results tab, you should see the product data that is left after the DELETE operation has been performed.

    results
  • Step 12

    Return to the procedure and further modify it. Enter code for a new output parameter. Also add the two lines of code for performing a SEARCH on the intermediate table variable.

    search
  • Step 13

    The complete code should look very similar to this.

    PROCEDURE "build_products" (
    	        out ex_products table (PRODUCTID nvarchar(10),
                                   CATEGORY nvarchar(20),
                                   PRICE decimal(15,2) ),
                out ex_pc_productid nvarchar(10) )
       LANGUAGE SQLSCRIPT
       SQL SECURITY INVOKER
       READS SQL DATA AS
    BEGIN
    
     declare lt_products table like :ex_products;
     declare lv_index int = 0;
     declare lv_del_index int array;
     declare lv_array_index int = 0;
    
     lt_products = select PRODUCTID, CATEGORY, PRICE from "MD.Products";
     :ex_products.INSERT(:lt_products);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductA', 'Software', '1999.99'), 1);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductB', 'Software', '2999.99'), 2);
     :ex_products.INSERT(('ProductC', 'Software', '3999.99'), 3);
    
     FOR lv_index IN 1..record_count(:ex_products) DO
       :ex_products.(PRICE).UPDATE((:ex_products.PRICE[lv_index] * 1.25), lv_index);
     END FOR;
    
     FOR lv_index IN 1..record_count(:ex_products) DO
       IF :ex_products.PRICE[lv_index] <= 2500.00 THEN
        lv_array_index = lv_array_index + 1;
        lv_del_index[lv_array_index] = lv_index;
      END IF;
     END FOR;
    
     :ex_products.DELETE(:lv_del_index);
    
     lv_index = :ex_products.SEARCH("CATEGORY", 'PC', 1);  
     ex_pc_productid = :ex_products.PRODUCTID[lv_index];
    
    
    END
    
    
  • Step 14

    Use what you have learned and Save your work, perform a Build on the module. Then return to the Database Explorer and call the procedure. In the Results tab, you should see the product data that is left after the DELETE operation has been performed in the first tab, and on the second results tab you should see the product id of the first row which category was equal to “PC”.

    results
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